• Jane Leder

First It Was "Family Feud." Now It's "The Voice."




If you've been reading my blog--I sure hope you have--you know that I realized that I'd hit bottom during the Pandemic when I started watching "Family Feud." Every day. Sometimes more than once because reruns can always be found. The truth is: I've always hated that show with the screaming family members, the host Steve Hardy and his deep guffaws that often sound like a cow mooing, and the out-of-step, arhythmic winners who bounce around the stage to music I'd never consider downloading, not in a million years.


Well, I've dropped "Family Feud" in favor of "The Voice." The Pandemic does strange things to us all, but my obsession with TV shows that in a sane world I'd never watch or that I've dumped years earlier remains a mystery. Now I'm sure Paul the therapist who stars in Netflix's "In Treatment" would have his theories--unresolved issues with my father or mother, my tendencies to procrastinate because I lack self-confidence or goals, or some such b.s.--but Paul has other clients to worry about, and he's not a real shink, anyway.


I'm not sure why week after week I sit glassy-eyed in front of the TV in our small den and watch contestants on "The Voice" get booted one by one. I think after tonight's show, the number of folks still standing will be down to eight. Among those eight might be this father/son duo whose singing is perfect for a high-end restaurant in the town from whence they hail but not for the winner of "The Voice." I mean they are cute and all and probably warm the cockles of parents' hearts. You know, the family that sings together stays together or something like that. If they somehow win "The Voice" this season, I'll have to find a new show to watch if this damn Pandemic marches on.


I rarely blog about fashion. It's not my "thing." But I have to say that the stylist(s) for "The Voice" need to be replaced. Like immediately. I mean, what are they thinking when they dress Kelly Clarkson in flower-print dresses cinched at the waist with a wide leather belt? If the bold patterns are supposed to bring back memories of the Sixties when young women wore floor-length dresses adorned with flowers and, yes, flowers in their hair, I don't see much of a resemblance. Those "flower children" were going to San Francisco, not to "The Voice."




Now, there are several female contestants who are large. So, what's the deal with the tight outfits that accentuate the negative that as far as I understand is a math concept that extends the concept of negative numbers? Whatever happened to the concept of accentuating the positive both in attitude and in fashion? (To be fair, I should mention that there are several large men on this year's "The Voice." It seems as if their stylists do all that they can to hide the men's girth and to, yep, accentuate the positive.)




As long as I'm on the subject of fashion, this post wouldn't be complete without a few comments about Ariana Grande's fashion choices. From what I gather, Grande has brought her own fashion style to "The Voice" and does not depend on the program's stylists. What a blessing. Grande is known as a fashionista, and her outfits show it. But I do have one bone to pick: it seems as if the camera is fixated on Grande every time she yanks at one of her skimpy strapless tops. There she goes again. Just for fun, I think I'll count the number of times Grande yanks on tonight's show and maybe consider hiring a videographer to put together a montage of Grande's efforts to hike her tops.


I'm not sure how I've gone from "Family Feud" to stylists and fashionistas on "The Voice." The only connection I see is that there are a lot of Fs.






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